Tutorial: Mixing With Separation EQ & Compression

In this tutorial we will look at blending all of the elements that make up a track by using some basic EQ separation between individual tracks in a mix. We also touch upon using sidechained multiband compression to further distinguish parts in the mix which may otherwise conflict with eachother.

In particular, we look closely at separating the Kick Drum from the Bass Instrument so that each can stand out and be clearly defined in the mix.

Tutorial: Compression Settings Explained

In this tutorial we look at the basics of compression, and how to effectively use the different compressor settings common to all compressors. Attack, Release, Ratio, and Threshold are explained and our example shows how to properly listen for the changes produced from these settings, focusing on the importance of Attack and Release settings in particular.

Review: Cubasis DAW on iPad & Midi Routing Tutorial

In this video we take a look at midi routing between Cubasis and outside apps, as well as a basic review of the different features available in Cubasis.

If you are interested in importing Cubasis sessions into Cubase 6 or Cubase 7, you will need the Cubasis importer extension. You can download it from our mirror under Software & Utilities, or go to Steinberg’s official Cubasis Session Importer page.

Quick Look: Sends With Benefits

In this Quick Look Tutorial we take a brief look at the advantages of using send / return FX channels vs simply using insert effects. This specific tutorial applies reverb as a send effect and we look at the processing paths that open up when isolating the wet track, such as allowing you to equalize, compress and gate the 100% wet send effect alone.

Quick Look: Compression Limiting Individual Tracks & Mixes

In our latest video tutorial, we take a quick-look overview of using limiters in audio mixing, explaining what the separate sections of a limiter do (threshold, release, dithering, etc) as well as the exact changes it does to your audio when contrasted with ordinary compression.
We also look at the somewhat controversial technique of using a limiter on individual tracks and busses versus applying it only as a final stage mastering effect.

Spoiler alert: in mixing, don’t let anyone tell you what you can and can’t do. Because what sounds good to your ears is what matters most.

♫ Doo Dee Doo Doooooooo ♫


With that said, it’s important to understand the limits of using a limiter in this way (nice pun, huh?) and its potential for ruining your mix when overused.